Urgent Updates | November 03, 2022

INFLUENZA INCIDENCE AND VACCINE EFFECTIVENESS DURING THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE INFLUENZA SEASON — CHILE, 2022
In 2022, influenza A (H3N2) virus, circulated in Chile months earlier than during prepandemic influenza seasons and was associated with 1,002 hospitalizations. Like certain Southern Hemisphere countries during the 2022 influenza season, Nothern Hemisphere countries might face influenza activity with atypical timing and intensity during 2022-2023 season.
Full Access: CDC

VIRAL SHEDDING 1 YEAR FOLLOWING FIRST-EPISODE GENITAL HSV-1 INFECTION
In this prospective cohort study, researchers followed participants for up to 2 years, with 82 participants followed up between 2013 and 2018. Genital HSV-1 shedding was detected on 12.1% of days at 2 months and declined significantly to 7.1% of days at 11 months. Most genital shedding was asymptomatic; genital and oral lesions and oral shedding were rare.
Full Access: JAMA

GLOBAL COVID CASES WILL INCREASE IN COMING MONTHS, BUT AT A SLOWER PACE
Daily global COVID-19 infections are projected to rise slowly to about 18.7 million by February from the current 16.7 million average daily cases, driven by the northern hemisphere’s winter months, the University of Washington said in an analysis. Far fewer infections are expected than last winter’s estimated peak daily average of about 80 million cases in January of 2022 that was driven by the rapid spread of the Omicron variant.
Full Access: Reuters

IS IT FLU, RSV OR COVID? EXPERTS FEAR THE ‘TRIPLEDEMIC’
Infectious disease experts are warning that a so-called tripledemic – influenza, COVID-19, and RSV – may be in the forecast. The flu season has gotten an early start. As of Oct. 21, early increases in seasonal flu activity have been reported in most of the country, the CDC says, with the southeast and south-central areas having the highest activity levels. Children’s hospitals and emergency departments are seeing a surge in children with RSV. COVID-19 cases are trending down, according to the CDC, but epidemiologists – scientists who study disease outbreaks – always have their eyes on emerging variants.
Full Access: Medscape